Workshop on AP Technologies

Workshop 2

Passive human detection, localization, and posture identification, using radio technologies

Abstract

This workshop is to address one of the most challenging issues in wireless radio based assisted living, i.e., to dynamically detect, localize and track, and identify the postures of multiple humans in indoor environment.
As Japanese, Europeans, etc., are growing older and healthier, these societies face tremendous challenges in securing the future wellness of a larger segment of its population requiring special attentions, e.g., the elderly and the physically impaired. This is expected to have a great impact on the future advancement of these societies. The emerging wireless technologies are enablers that can be applied to solve many of the wellness challenges, e.g., through the clever combination of wireless radio and smart buildings. Moreover, radio systems are less sensitive to visibility conditions to operate appropriately. Therefore, they naturally mitigate possible privacy concerns that may arise as compared to the camera- or the visible light-based systems where people are “observed” directly through image data or under visible conditions.
The wireless radio-based assisted living can be achieved through the passive detection, the localization and the posture identification of humans. Here “passive” indicates that the assisted individual needs not to wear or carry any additional devices, i.e. “device-free”. The existing passive systems employ the time of arrival, the angle of arrival, the received signal strength (RSS), the complex channel state information of radio waves to perform localization. For example, fingerprinting, a localization technique based on RSS measurements, consists of an offline phase to build a database from surveyed signals at known positions. The process is labour intensive and is not robust against changes in physical environment. Alternatively, in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems, antenna arrays with many elements provide sufficient spatial resolution to discern signals coming from different directions, while wideband provide delay resolution to separate multiple copies of these signals in time. The temporal-spatial-delay domain profiles contain information on human form-factors as well as on surrounding objects. However, it is challenging to sort out human-relevant information.

About the speakers

Assistant Prof. Dr. Yang Miao

Name
Assistant Prof. Dr. Yang Miao
Affiliation
Twente University, the Netherlands

Yang Miao received her M.Sc. and PhD degrees from the Radio Propagation Laboratory, Mobile Radio Communication Group, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in Sep. 2012 and Sep. 2015, respectively. From 2015 to 2018, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher with Prof. Claude Oestges, Universite Catholique de Louvain, and with IMEC-WAVES, Ghent University, Belgium. From 2018 to 2019, she was working under the Shenzhen Peacock Talent Program, first as a Senior Engineer in Jaguar Radio Tech., and then as a Research Assistant Professor in the Southern University of Science and Technology, China. From Aug. 2019, she becomes an Assistant Professor in the Radio System, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Twente, the Netherlands. She was a visiting researcher in Aalto University, Chalmers University of Technology, Cambodia Institute of Technology, Katholieke University of Leuven, and Ranplan Wireless UK. She is a member of IEEE, EuMA, and EurAAP.
Her research interests are mainly in the interactions between antenna arrays and radio propagation environment including the presence of human. Specific topics include the passive and active radio channel measurement, antenna de-embedding, channel characterization and modeling, optimization of multiantenna array configuration and massive MIMO topology, channel emulation in multi-probe anechoic chamber for over-the-air testing, room electromagnetics and reverberation, orthogonal modes and multi-mode channel, deterministic ray tracer and propagation graph, diffuse scattering, radio channel assisted passive human detection, localization and posture identification.

Prof. Dr. Minseok Kim

Name
Prof. Dr. Minseok Kim
Affiliation
Niigata University, Japan

Minseok Kim was born in Seoul, Korea. He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, M.E. and D.E. degrees in Division of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University (YNU), Japan in 1999, 2002 and 2005, respectively. He has been with Tokyo Institute of Technology from 2007 as an assistant professor. He has been on leave to Georgia Institute of Technology as a visiting scholar in 2010. From 2014, he joined Graduate School of Engineering, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan as an associate professor. His research interests include radio propagation channel sounding and modelling, radar and imaging, millimetre-wave/terahertz radios, body area network, antenna array signal processing, cognitive and software defined radios. He is a senior member of IEEE.

Prof. Dr. Jörg Schäfer

Name
Prof. Dr. Jörg Schäfer
Affiliation
Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Jörg Schäfer received Diploma, and Ph.D degrees in Physics and Mathematics from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany in 1991, and 1993, respectively. After working as a strategy and IT-consultant in the industry from 1995-2009, he joined the faculty of Engineering and Computer Science (CS) at Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences in 2009, where he is currently professor for CS and the chairman of the B.Sc. in CS. His current interests are in the area of machine learning, human activity recognition, and antenna array signal processing including sensing with channel state information. He is the author of several dozen research papers from pure mathematics to applied computer science. He serves as a Reviewer Board Member for MDPI Information journal. He is a member of the IEEE.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Savazzi

Name

Prof. Dr. Stefano Savazzi

Affiliation
Consigslio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Italy

Stefano Savazzi received the Ph.D. (Hons.) degree in information technology from the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, in 2008. In 2012, he joined the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) of Italy as a Researcher with the Institute of Electronics, Computer and Telecommunication Engineering (IEIIT). He co-authored over 100 scientific publications. Research interests include signal processing, EM modelling and learning design aspects for passive radio localization in beyond 5G networks. He serves as Associate Editor for the Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Journal (Wiley-Hindawi ed.) and Topic Editor for Sensors (MDPI pub.) He was the recipient of the 2008 Dimitris N. Chorafas Foundation Award.

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